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Classified Documents; terrorism-related arrests during past 3 years

2014 Weekly Dec 23 2014 
The 2014 Weekly accessed to a bunch of classified documents that indicate 13,624 people were arrested -including 442 foreign nationals- in charges of terrorist activities by the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) during more than past 3 years, however the destiny of these convicts are not clear yet whether they are imprisoned or released! 
Our findings reveal that ANSF could foil 13,775 terrorist plots -including 165 suicide would-be bombings- from the beginning of the 1390 untilmid-year of the current solar year 1393. Meanwhile the military operations could seize 269 suicide vests, 38 explosive-laden vehicles and 295,969 kilo grams of explosive materials. 
Based on the documents and amid the efforts for Afghan peace process, only 4,726 armed opponents lay arms and joined the peace process during more than 3 recent years in Afghanistan. The data reveals that ANSF also arrested 925 people – 30 of them foreign nationals- relevant to the weapon, drug, ancient pieces and human smuggling. 
Documents contain data which claims that 1,251 people – 12 foreign nationals- were arrested for murder, kidnapping and robbery cases while 909 others -including 59 foreigners- were detained for forgery, bribe and embezzling the public asset crimes. Besides Afghan security personnel arrested 261 foreign nationals -198 Pakistanis and 45 Iranians- who illegally crossed the Afghan borders. 
Thus, below are the break-down data that tells each case with full details: 
1- Arrested in Terrorist and Political Crimes 
13,264 arrested (442 foreign nationals) in more than 3 years 

2011: 2,901 Afghans and 97 foreigners 
Suicide bombers: 26 Afghans and 11 foreign nationals 
Explosions: 1,800 Afghans and 37 foreign nationals 
Armed assailants: 96 Afghans and 2 foreign nationals 
Kidnapping: 235 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
Espionage activities: 14 Afghans and 6 foreign nationals 
Propagandas against government: 16 Afghans 
Cooperation with government armed opponents: 302 Afghans and 6 foreign nationals 
Keeping arms and explosives: 93 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
Taliban members: 54 Afghans and 4 foreign nationals 
Member of GulbudinHekmatyar’sHezb-e-Islami: 4 Afghan 
Al Qaeda members: 2 Afghans and 2 foreign nationals 
Under prosecution: 18 Afghans 
Suspects: 241 Afghans and 27 foreign nationals 
————————————————————– 
2012: 3,795 Afghans and 151 foreigners 
Suicide bombers: 57 Afghans and 11 foreign nationals 
Explosions: 2,677 Afghans and 97 foreign nationals 
Armed assailants: 134 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
Kidnapping: 230 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
Espionage activities: 15 Afghans and 7 foreign nationals 
Propagandas against government: 16 Afghans 
Cooperation with government armed opponents: 263 Afghans and 9 foreign nationals 
Keeping arms and explosives: 103 Afghans 
Taliban members: 88 Afghans and 5 foreign nationals 
Member of GulbudinHekmatyar’sHezb-e-Islami: 1 Afghan 
Under prosecution: 7 Afghans 
Suspects: 196 Afghans and 20 foreign nationals 
————————————————————— 
2013: 3,589 Afghans and 84 foreigners 
Suicide bombers: 24 Afghans and 5 foreign nationals 
Explosions: 2,606 Afghans and 54 foreign nationals 
Armed assailants: 86 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
Kidnapping: 351 Afghans 
Espionage activities: 15 Afghans and 4 foreign nationals 
Propagandas against government: 16 Afghans 
Cooperation with government armed opponents: 262 Afghans and 9 foreign nationals 
Keeping arms and explosives: 120 Afghans 
Taliban members: 18 Afghans 
Member of GulbudinHekmatyar’sHezb-e-Islami: 7 Afghans 
Under prosecution: 18 Afghans 
Suspects: 66 Afghans and 11 foreign nationals 
—————————————————————— 
2014 (until 10 months of the year): 2,537 Afghans and 110 foreigners 
Suicide bombers: 21 Afghans and 5 foreign nationals 
Explosions: 1,801 Afghans and 74 foreign nationals 
Armed assailants: 111 Afghans and 4 foreign nationals 
Kidnapping: 164 Afghans and 2 foreign nationals 
Espionage activities: 8 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
Propagandas against government: 16 Afghans 
Cooperation with government armed opponents: 249 Afghans and 10 foreign nationals 
Keeping arms and explosives: 55 Afghans 
Taliban members: 6 Afghans 
Member of GulbudinHekmatyar’sHezb-e-Islami: 4 Afghans 
Al Qaeda members: 1 Afghan and 3 foreign nationals 
Under prosecution: 9 Afghans 
Suspects: 92 Afghans and 11 foreign nationals 
******************************* 
2- Foiling Terrorist Plots 
Statistics: 13,775 cases (in more than 3 years) 
2011: 2,829 cases 
2012: 3,997 cases 
2013: 4,261 cases 
2014 (during 10 months): 2,688 cases 
—————————————— 
Suicide Attacks: 165 attacks 
2011: 41 attacks 
2012: 68 attacks 
2013: 29 attacks 
2014 (during 10 months): 27 attacks 
—————————————— 
Suicide vests: 269 
Explosive-laden vehicles: 38 
Explosive materials: 295,969 kilo grams 
******************************** 
3- Afghan Peace Process 
Number of opponents who quitted insurgency: 4,726 people 
Taliban members: 4,501 people 
Member of GulbudinHekmatyar’sHezb-e-Islami: 131 people 
Irresponsible armed groups: 94 people 
******************************** 
4- Smuggling 
925 people including 30 foreign nationals 
———————————————- 
2011: 194 Afghans and 3 foreign nationals 
Weapons and explosives: 97 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
Ancient pieces: 9 Afghans 
Human trafficking: 4 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
Drugs: 84 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
———————————————- 
2012: 156 Afghans and 22 foreign nationals 
Weapons and explosives: 73 Afghans and 2 foreign nationals 
Ancient pieces: 4 Afghans 
Human trafficking: 6 Afghans and 18 foreign nationals 
Drugs: 73 Afghans and 2 foreign nationals 
————————————————- 
2013: 410 Afghans and 4 foreign nationals 
Weapons and explosives: 78 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
Ancient pieces: 33 Afghans 
Human trafficking: 33 Afghans and 2 foreign nationals 
Drugs: 266 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
————————————————– 
2014 (during 10 months): 135 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
Weapons and explosives: 48 Afghans 
Ancient pieces: 8 Afghans 
Human trafficking: 21 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
Drugs: 58 Afghans 
************************************* 
5- Organised Crimes 
909 people including 59 foreign nationals 
————————————————— 
2011: 171 Afghans and 24 foreign nationals 
Forgery: 105 Afghans and 24 foreign nationals 
Bribery: 49 Afghans 
Embezzlement: 17 Afghans 
————————————————— 
2012: 242 Afghans and 10 foreign nationals 
Forgery: 166 Afghans and 10 foreign nationals 
Bribery: 46 Afghans 
Embezzlement: 28 Afghans 
—————————————————- 
2013: 283 Afghans and 18 foreign nationals 
Forgery: 212 Afghans and 18 foreign nationals 
Bribery: 50 Afghans 
Embezzlement: 21 Afghans 
—————————————————- 
2014 (during 10 months): 156 Afghans and 7 foreign nationals 
Forgery: 107 Afghans and 7 foreign nationals 
Bribery: 40 Afghans 
Embezzlement: 9 Afghans 
********************************* 
6- Other Crimes (murder, robbery etc…) 
1,251 people including 12 foreign nationals 
2011: 296 Afghans and 1 foreign national 
2012: 376 Afghans 
2013: 332 Afghans and 8 foreign nationals 
2014 (during 10 months): 235 Afghans and 3 foreign nationals.

5 priorities for Afghanistan

CNN October 7th, 2014
But while the peaceful and democratic transfer of power marks a milestone in Afghanistan’s tumultuous history, the country faces mounting security and governance challenges as international support is diminishing. To ensure long-term stability, the following five priorities should top the new government’s agenda.

1- Fostering national unity: The American-brokered deal to form a government of national unity was the best outcome for Afghanistan and its international partners alike. This year’s election campaign divided Afghans on ethnic and factional lines like never before, and without the power-sharing deal, the winner of the fraud-tainted vote wouldn’t have enjoyed broad-based legitimacy to maintain stability and govern effectively. Leaving election season acrimony behind, the two leaders must now devise a national agenda that promotes unity among all Afghans, ensure the new government makeup is inclusive, and marginalize warlords and ultra ethno-nationalists who may attempt to undermine the unity government.

2- Improving governance: Although the new government is more the outcome of a political compromise than a credible election, Afghans will ultimately judge the government’s legitimacy and popularity by its ability to deliver basic services. Last year, Afghanistan ranked the world’s most corrupt nation; state institutions remain weak; and governance conditions are likely to further deteriorate as foreign funding is drying up. Additionally, the United States and other foreign donors have made it clear that future financial aid to Afghanistan will be conditioned on the government’s measures to curb corruption and improve accountability.

3- Bolstering economy: Over the past decade, the United States and its allies have failed to build an indigenous, sustainable economy in Afghanistan, as foreign aid and spending still account for more than 90 percent of the country’s $20 billion GDP. The drawdown of foreign troops has already had a significant impact on the Afghan economy: economic growth last year plummeted to 3.6 percent from 14.4 percent in 2012; the Kabul government has reportedly run out of money to pay for its bills; real estate prices have declined by up to 50 percent; inflation and unemployment are soaring; and business conditions have deteriorated. To shore up the economy, the new government has to implement institutional reforms to attract foreign investment, strengthen tax and customs administration, and root out corruption.

4- Combating narcotics: The $10 billion U.S. investment in the past decade to combat drugs in Afghanistan has largely failed, and the country remains the world’s largest producer of opium. The illicit drug economy not only provides for a quarter of the Taliban’s $400 million annual budget, but it also threatens to promote corruption and instability at an even larger degree as foreign aid declines. To tackle the growing drug problem, the next government must devise a comprehensive plan that includes strengthening law enforcement institutions, pursuing aggressive eradication and interdiction efforts while incentivizing farmers who cultivate licit crops, weakening the Taliban’s influence in poppy-growing regions, and prosecuting government officials involved in the drugs business.

5- Improving security: Once the next president is in office, security should be the first order of business. While the Taliban failed to disrupt the election, the terrorist group remains a potent force and is readying itself for a comeback. This year, the terrorist group capitalized on the election stalemate and the vacuum left by withdrawing foreign troops by stepping up attacks across the country to project power and seize territory.

On September 26, a large group of Taliban and foreign fighters reportedly captured a strategic district near the Afghan capital, killing 70 villagers including 15 by beheading. In the past months, the terrorist group has brought under siege four districts in southern Helmand Province, carried out suicide and spectacular attacks in Kabul and other major population centers, and has expanded its presence in previously peaceful central and northern regions. Efforts by the Afghan and U.S. governments to negotiate peace with the Taliban have failed; and with the exit of foreign troops l
ooming, the group appears to be more confident about a military victory than eager to make peace. The new government must refrain from its predecessor’s policies that have only empowered the Taliban, such as releasing militant commanders from jail. Instead, it should focus on empowering and reforming the security and law enforcement institutions.
While the new government must lead all security and governance responsibilities, it cannot address these daunting challenges alone and will continue to require substantial foreign military and financial assistance in the years ahead. And the Obama administration, too, must avoid repeating the mistake of Iraq and reconsider its plan to pull out all troops from Afghanistan by the end of 2016.
A precipitous exit risks undoing the gains of the past decade and would allow al Qaeda and associated forces to reconstitute in parts of Afghanistan and destabilize neighboring Pakistan.

ANA, One of Karzai's Top Legacies

September 25, 2014
Formation of the Afghan National Army (ANA) and development of the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) were among outing President Hamid Karzai's top priorities during his 13 year presidency. Now as his term comes to an end, Karzai leaves behind his presidential legacy with security forces able to protect the nation despite all challenges.
According to the Ministry of Defense (MoD), if the ANA is provided with necessary arms and weaponries, the forces could be regionally unique. "We can count on the ANA on a regional level," MoD spokesman Zahir Azimi said. "With more investments, the ANA could be unique in the region."

The ANA has conducted at least 6,000 nighttime military operations and has accomplished major military tasks despite the lack of sufficient artillery. "We still have no defending army, it is only an anti-rebel army, it still has long ways to go," military commentator Jawed Kohistani said.
The total number of soldiers serving in the ANA ranks is about 150,000, with an additional 195,000 in the Afghan National Police (ANP) branch. With the new president being inaugurated on Monday, the new government's approach to the ANA's future and development is a major topic of discussion.